Small Multiple Flows in Tableau

Small Multiple Flows in Tableau

Small Multiple Flows live up to their name, combining small multiples and flow elements in a single viz. This allows us to combine a set of events, providing an intense data visualization about these events, while also connecting one event to the next via the flow element. This technique does need a viewer to invest some time into understanding the various pieces of the visual. There is a lot going on, thus it will definitely require effort and a little time on the viewer’s part (and why I put detailed legends on both visualizations).

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Layering data for custom Tableau visualizations

Layering data for custom Tableau visualizations

This post outlines a method that has been shared before in the Tableau community. I was initially introduced to it by Noah Salvaterra’s Chord Diagram a while back. 

I am going to walk you through a layering technique, which allows use, and re-use of a single axis in Tableau. This can be done at different levels of granularity, different fields entirely or completely synchronized throughout, thus it can adapt pretty well to various use cases. Need to create a dual-axis in a single axis? This technique can enable this for us (as long as you need the same mark type that is). 

So What? With this technique you can build more detailed and very customized visualizations directly within Tableau (without the need for extensive data prep).

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More options for your Tableau Sankey Diagram

More options for your Tableau Sankey Diagram

A quick look around Tableau Public can often lead you to a Sankey diagram at some point. I can only speak from my experience, but the majority of these visuals (including mine thus far) leverage the sigmoid function. This technique has been posted about and presented on (including by me) quite a few times across the Tableau community, I first found it on Jeff Shaffer’s Blog and this has of course morphed many times and ways, for example, some of the great work done by Olivier Catherin to build a Sankey leveraging polygons (also found on Jeff’s Blog).

Not so recently, Tableau came out with some improved dashboard spacing capabilities in version 10.4. I had been awaiting this feature for a while and could not wait to update some of my Tableau Public work in order to take advantage of it (granted it took me a while to do so). Now we can get rid of those annoying spaces which have been forced into our (tiled) visuals to date.

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Talk to your Tableau Dashboard

Talk to your Tableau Dashboard

Shouldn't an author be able to explain their Tableau Dashboard to every person who views it? Of course they should! This capability should be available to authors and accessible to their end users, regardless of the end user's abilities. We should also make Tableau's awesome interactive capabilities as accessible as we can as web users have vastly diverse abilities.

We noodled around some ideas of how we could enable the Tabitha project for those who did not want to write any code. This blog is the (hopefully) first step toward that effort…

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Visualizing MLB pitch location data with Alteryx + Tableau

Visualizing MLB pitch location data with Alteryx + Tableau

This project started with some really interesting reading on the work done by brooks baseball (Dan Brooks and several others) and fastballs (by Mike Fast) sites. There are references to these sites throughout this post. 

Data gathering & preparation work

I used the Perl script from the fastballs - build a pitch db page to download the data from this MLBAM site. Then I leveraged Alteryx to parse the 2.47 million XML files (no, that is not a typo) over the 8 years I pulled data for. Here is a summary of files and their combined size by year.

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Where's DataBlick at #data17?

Where's DataBlick at #data17?

We're saddened and outraged by the tragedy in Las Vegas and offer our sympathies to those affected. And we are determined to help make the Tableau Conference a place of connection, community, and support for the attendees and those who were affected. Please check the #data17donates hashtag for how you can help out yourself, the Tableau community is already responding!

We've got a smaller crew than usual at #data17—it might be hard to believe, but babies and little ones can be even more fun than the Tableau Conference. No matter what, though, we're going to rock some new tee shirts, here's a sneak preview:

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Dataviz Fun for #Datakids

Dataviz Fun for #Datakids

As we all get ready for back to school (or are already back in school), whether it be Kindergarten or 8th grade its always fun to get vizzing and to get your kids involved!

Recently, the one and only Anya A’Hearn posted her inspiring quantified self project “Consumed”. My daughters are quite young, in the womb, 3 and almost 6. The thought I had was to have them build this type of viz with something they have way more of than they need. For us, an easy candidate for this was their (ridiculous) stuffed animal collection.

Since the kids are so young, having them document this in Excel and then create a Tableau viz wasn’t really going to happen (yet I made sure it did), so we embarked to create our dataviz on the floor of their room. First things first, we took all of the stuffed animals and tossed the into a one big pile…

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Step lines and supported bars in Tableau

Step lines and supported bars in Tableau

Step Lines

I am a big fan of step lines (here is a good example from datasketch.es) so I was really excited to see that line type announced at last year’s Devs on Stage. While we wait for that feature to be provided directly within the product, we have two choices: (1) don’t use them, or (2) build them ourselves. Choice two is much more the DataBlick way, so I have tried to provide you with a few steps that you can follow to build this chart type yourself. You can also take a look at Tim Ngwena’s post here which details another method that you can look into for your use case.

Step lines are just lines at the end of the day. When I started looking into how to plot their points accordingly, the prep work reminded me quite a bit of the data prep needed for Jump Plot. We basically need to take our list of points and add an additional mark for each point, and potentially one at the origin (0,0) if that is desired for our viz (as it was in this case). I will be using step lines to help analyze the scoring to par across PGA tournaments this year.

Here is a small sample of the data we will be working with going forward, this is an aggregated data set, looking at the average score to par for pros on the PGA tour this year. We are going to plot “hole” on the x-axis and “Avg Score” on the y-axis to make our viz.

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Weighted Medians for Weighted Data in Tableau

Weighted Medians for Weighted Data in Tableau

There are two ways weighted medians get talked about in Tableau: The first type of weighted median is the one we covered in our earlier Padawan Dojo: Weighted Averages and Weighted Medians post where we’re aggregating a data set and we want to make sure the median is computed over the underlying records. This post is about the second type of weighted median when the data itself has a weight, for example in survey data where each respondent has an assigned weight and we want to find the weighted median value of responses.

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Padawan Dojo: Weighted Averages and Medians in Tableau

Padawan Dojo: Weighted Averages and Medians in Tableau

This is the first of two posts on weighted averages and medians, this one introduces a problem we've seen multiple times where reference lines aren't properly weighted. We need to use a different set of options in Tableau to get the desired results and are helped by an understanding of the different levels of detail that Tableau uses to aggregate measures.

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Building SVG Paths in Alteryx + Tableau

Building SVG Paths in Alteryx + Tableau

Background

Recently my family watched Disney’s Moana for the first time. We all really enjoyed the movie, especially my two young daughters. After the movie was over, my five-year-old noticed the spiral in the title on the movie case and asked me whether I could build it on the computer. I figured this was as good an opportunity as any to show her the power and possibilities of math. 

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Analyzing 538's March Madness Win Probabilities with Alteryx and Tableau

Analyzing 538's March Madness Win Probabilities with Alteryx and Tableau

Story:

The concept for the story comes from visually comparing these two games (and several others like them). As I followed the early rounds of the 2017 tournament and tracked the games via 538’s predictions site, it seemed, more often then not that Men’s tournament games were closer then the Women’s.

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Telling a Story in Tableau

This short post is around trying to create an article like structure with in-line visualizations all within Tableau. Inspiration for this pulls from sites like 538 and polygraph as well as several authors from the Tableau Public community (like the one noted below, this recent VotD).

There have been many examples across the Tableau Public community showing the data storytelling capabilities of Tableau. These include leveraging additional JS libraries (via API/embed) like reveal.js (thank you Jeff Shaffer!), but others that caught my eye recently where examples of building out an entire story in a long form Tableau dashboard. Here is one example that Rob Radburn posted recently that got me thinking. Note: there are several others, this one by Rob is just a single recent example. 

I decided to see just how much work it is to do something like this, all within Tableau. The answer... not all that much. Like every tool, Tableau makes some hard things easy and some easy things hard. This type of visualization is a great example of the former and demonstrates the creativity that Tableau can empower it's Desktop users with. The viz story is just a simple collection of visualization sheets and text boxes, you can download the workbook to see how I went about laying out the story. The viz below is best viewed in landscape, hope you like it! 

Rose Curves in Tableau

Rose Curves in Tableau

I love when people get creative and come up with visuals like these, if you want to see more, check out Shirley Wu’s project with Nadieh Bremer at datasketch.es for starters. Techniques like these (or using things like the rose curve) to encode data will definitely require a more engaged user base. Readers will need to take some time to understand what each rose petal/shape is and then it will take them time to compare the petals across the visual. This type of technique is probably not the best choice to visualize your data when granular differences between your marks need to be analyzed by your reader.

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X, Y and a bit of Z - Cheater 3D Orthographic Views & Making everything "Spatial"

X, Y and a bit of Z - Cheater 3D Orthographic Views & Making everything "Spatial"

Anya must have pinged me 10 times over the course of the last week asking me questions about rendering 3d cars in Tableau. I figured it must have something to do with curing malaria. My reply was a bit ironic given the fact that I’ve done my own 3d car. I did it for fun though… I don’t like being told I can’t do stuff. it just doesn’t work as part of a production workbook. Well… from a performance standpoint maybe we will get there soon. But for now my suggestion was to pick a good angle and then drive a steamroller over it and just make it into polygons. I really should have seen the next question coming, but she asked how to do that. I was stumped. My best idea was, hire a graphic artist to trace it for you…

Last night she told me she solved it using QGIS… mind explosion! Of course! Why not use mapping software for this? Geography isn’t the only thing spatial. Why shouldn’t you use QGIS to map your car, your plane, the shelves of your supermarket, what have you. I always thought background images were misplaced in Tableau, I wonder if this is what they were thinking when they put it under maps. Latitude and Longitude are just a special name for x and y (or is it the other way around?). Why not hijack Tableau’s mapping capabilities and import your polygons as custom shapes?

I’ve gone to great lengths to hack multiple layers onto maps, so I was excited to hear multi-layered maps will be coming to Tableau, but this opens the door to hacking that feature into all sorts of things. Someone once told me that everything in Tableau is a scatterplot but I’m starting to think maybe everything should be a map. Oh… I am going to crash that Beta so hard!

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On the topic of community: & being friends and mentors.

On the topic of community:  & being friends and mentors.

First - sign up and sign up for Emily Kunde's Mentor Match program, and have a chance to win an hour of help with either Allan or Anya as well as other prizes to be announced on Emily's site soon.  

This friendship started with a Tweet:  March 5th, 2014 Tweet to @AllanWalkerIT help…..!  ? "Since you are the king of Tableau Maps, I wanted to see if you had any suggestions?"  For over two years now, we have worked together on many collaborations.   We hope with a quick review of how we have expanded our skills by working together, you can learn from our take-aways and find friends and mentors to work with. 

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Tableau Padawan: Faster Nested Sorts

Tableau Padawan: Faster Nested Sorts

Tableau's sorting behavior is somewhere between "a little weird" and "WTF?!?" for those of used to the nested sorting behavior we can get in Excel and other tools. This is one case where Tableau's "mental model" of sorting doesn't match the mental model of many users, if you'd like Tableau to change this you can vote for the Independent Sorting feature request. Explaining why Tableau sorts the way it does would take a much longer post, for now, I'm going to skip the "why" for the "how" and the "what" and jump into my preferred & faster way to do nested sorting using an ad-hoc calculation.

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